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NewsBook: Missouri Government News for Week of January 29, 2001

 


. Bill to lower Missouri's blood alcohol content level for drivers sent to Senate (02/01/01)
JEFFERSON CITY - The Senate Transporation Committee passed the bill to lower the BAC in Missouri to .08 from .10.

This is the fifth year such a bill has been introduced and if it's passed it could get Missouri millions of dollars.

  • Get the radio story.
  • Get the newspaper story.
    . The Missouri Senate rejected a House resolution that would have prevented a pay raise for lawmakers. (01/31/01)
    JEFFERSON CITY - By a voice vote, the Missouri Senate rejected the House resolution.

    Lawmakers had until midnight Wednesday to reject a pay increase plan from the state's salary commission.

    The plan, subject to subsequent appropriations, will allow lawmakers to get salary increases exceeding 5% for the next two years.

  • Get the radio story.
  • Get the newspaper story.
  • Get the House roll-call vote.
    . Committee hears two plans affecting MoDOT (01/31/01)
    JEFFERSON CITY - A pair of separate proposals faced little or no oppostion in a House Transportation Committee hearing Wednesday.

    One plan would let Missouri voters decide if they want MoDOT to build toll roads, while the other would put MoDOT in charge of roads within St. Louis city limits.

  • Get the radio story on toll roads.
  • Get the radio story on St. Louis roads.
    . Power for university faculty members (01/31/01)
    JEFFERSON CITY - A House bill would give university faculty a seat on the governing boards of public university's in Missouri.

    While faculty members currently do not sit on governing boards, students have had this right for more than 12 years.

  • Get the radio story.
    . Missourians who don't pay off their student loans will face new consequences under a proposed bill. (01/31/01)
    JEFFERSON CITY - If Missourians don't pay back their student loans, they will lose their professional licenses under a proposed bill.

    If people don't pay back their loans, legislators say other students suffer.

  • Get the radio story.
    . House has rejected a pay plan for legislators, statewide elected officials and judges. (01/31/01)
    JEFFERSON CITY - By a vote of 147-7, House members voted to reject a pay increase plan recommended by the Citizens Salary Commission.

    The resolution now goes to the Senate for a final vote. The legislature has until midnight Wednesday night to take action or the pay raises take effect, although some legislators argue they will be subject to appropriation.

  • Get the radio story.
    . Voting made easy? Bills would make voting more convenient for voters (01/30/01)
    JEFFERSON CITY - Overflowing polling places may be less of a concernif the House passes several baills aimed at making voting more convenient.

  • Get the radio story.
    . Holden pledges $32 million annually to fund life sciences research (01/30/01)
    JEFFERSON CITY - Missouri Gov. Bob Holden proposed using a portion of the state's tobacco settlement to fund life sciences research at large public institutions such as MU over 25 years.

    The funding would be contingent on settlement of related tobacco lawsuits.

  • Get the newspaper story.
    . Holden proposes education intiatives during his State of the State address (01/30/01)
    JEFFERSON CITY - In keeping with one of his campaign messages, Gov. Holden addressed several measures for improving the quality of education throughout the state during his State of the State address to legislators on Tuesday.

    Some of his key goals are to fully fund the school foundation formula, increase teachers' salaries upon National Board certification and implement character education in schools.

  • Get the newspaper story.
    . Governor Bob Holden delivers his first State of the State Address (01/30/01)
    JEFFERSON CITY - In his first address Gov. Holden said education and a balanced budget are his priorities for the session.

    Republicans say he was missing some details about some other aspects of his address.

  • Get the newspaper story.
    . Holden plan for tobacco settlement money pronounced "DOA" by top Republicans (01/30/01)
    JEFFERSON CITY - Despite a call for bipartisanship, Missouri's new Democratic governor found one of his key proposals declared DOA by a top GOP leader.

    During his State of the State address to a joint session of the legislature Tuesday, Holden said he would issue an executive order establishing a trust fund for tobacco settlement money that would be earmarked to pay for a variety of health care initiatives.

  • Get the newspaper story.
    . Missouri's secretary of state proposes a long list of election changes. (01/30/01)
    JEFFERSON CITY - The butter-fly ballot that generated so much controversy in Florida would be history in Missouri under a package of recommendations made by Secretary of State Roy Blunt.

    Blunt also recommended advanced voting and that an effort be made to move election day to a national holiday date.

  • Get the package of radio stories.
  • Get the companion radio story on Blunt's budget proposal.
    . The state auditor reports local governments are not getting the best prices possible on audits. (01/29/01)
    JEFFERSON CITY - Missouri's state auditor reports Missouri taaxpayers are paying $83 million more than neecessary because bonds are not being sold competitively.

    The audit found that most of the general obligation bonds being issued by schools and local governments are being privately sold.

  • Get the radio story.
    . GOP proposes education plan. (01/30/01)
    JEFFERSON CITY - Increased funding for teachers including pay raises were among the education recommendations proposed by House Republicans.

    The House GOP education package also included a fast-track teacher certification process to alleviate what Republicans termed a serious teacher shortage.

  • Get the radio story.