From Missouri Digital News: https://mdn.org
MDN Menu

MDN Home

Journalist's Creed

Print

MDN Help

MDN.ORG: Missouri Digital News
MDN Menu

MDN Home

Journalist's Creed

Print

MDN Help

MDN.ORG Mo. Digital News Missouri Digital News MDN.ORG: Mo. Digital News MDN.ORG: Missouri Digital News
Help  


House passes bill loosening window tinting law

January 16, 2002
By: Brian Connolly
State Capital Bureau

JEFFERSON CITY - You'll be able to drive slightly darker under the first bill to pass the Missouri House this session.

The bill passed Wednesday would allow front windows and side-wing vents to be tinted with material that allows 35 percent light transmission, while removing restrictions on the tinting of rear and rear side windows. Tinting beyond 35 percent would be allowed only if prescribed by a physician.

Last year, lawmakers passed restrictions on auto window tinting that added the restrictions to the auto-safety inspection process.

That's generated complaints to lawmakers from constituents whose vehicles failed state inspection because of window tinting.

"Right now I've got some constituents that, they're waiting, their license plates expire in January and they cannot get their cars inspected," said Rep. John Griesheimer, R-Washington. "They've already failed until this passes."

To provide immediate relief, the bill passed by the House has an emergency clause that would put the changes into effect immediately after approval by the governor. Otherwise, legislation does not take effect until late summer.

The bill takes checks of window tinting out of state vehicle inspections and puts them into the hands of law enforcement. O'Connor said the bill has the support of the Highway Patrol and hopes the transition to the new law is finished by the end of the month.

Rep. Chuck Purgason, R-Caulfield, said it bothered him that legislation passed last year had to be fixed.

"My concern was a lot of people had to run around the state right now that may have to pay fines and stuff due to a screw-up that this body has done on them," Purgason said.

O'Connor said he felt the issue had received a sufficient amount of debate when it came up last year.

"Sometimes you create legislation that has to be corrected the next year," he said.

The bill passed 139-3 and the emergency clause passed 130-5. It now goes to the Senate.