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Missouri House Gives Preliminary Approval to Bill Allowing Peace Officers to Live Where They Want.

April 9, 2002
By: JiaoJiao Shen
State Capital Bureau

Cities, towns, and counties will not be able to require their peace officers to live within the jurisdiction they serve, under a bill given first-round approval in the Missouri House. JiaoJiao Shen reports from Jefferson City.

Story:
RunTime: 2:43
OutCue: SOC

The Missouri House gave preliminary approval to a bill sponsored by Representative Joan Barry from St. Louis County.

The bill lets police officers live where they choose, even if it is outside of the city, town, or county they work.

Barry says this bill does not let cities decide where the officers must live.

Actuality:BAR1
RunTime: 10
OutCue: condition of employment
Contents: Barry says the bill states that no city, town, or county can require a peace officer to reside within the limits of the city or town as a condition of employment.

For example, if a police officer works in Jackson County, but he lives right across the county line, then, currently, he cannot work in Jackson County.

Under this bill, however, he would still be able to work in Jackson County.

This bill faced opposition on the House floor when it was debated Monday afternoon and Tuesday morning.

Some opposers said an officer should have to live where they work because it is essential to their job.

Representative Tom Villa of St. Louis City is one of those against the bill.

Actuality:VIL1
RunTime: 15
OutCue: help us rebuild
Contents: Villa thinks it is absolutely necessary that officers are visible in the community, drive their police cars home and park them in the neighborhoods, and stick around and help St. Louis rebuild.

Other opposers said the bill takes power away from local cities.

For example, Representative Peter Myers said the requirements cities pose for employees are legitimate.

Actuality:MYERS1
RunTime: 10
OutCue: vote against this bill
Contents: Myers says this bill takes away local control from the cities and in many instances, there should be requirements. He encourages that his colleagues vote against this bill.

Others just think this bill is non-sensible.

Representative Connie Johnson of St. Louis City says it should be common sense to live in the community you serve.

Actuality:JOHNSON1
RunTime: 16
OutCue: what happens there
Contents: Johnson says if you live in an area that you have to protect and serve, then why not live in that area. If you don't live there, then you don't have a real vested interest in what goes on there.

Aside from opposition, many representatives also had amendments to add to the bill.

Representative Don Lograsso from Jackson County offered a two-part amendment designed to help the bill.

Actuality:LOGRAS1
RunTime: 15
OutCue: appropriate amount of time is
Contents: Lograsso says the amendment allows police departments, sheriffs, etc to require their officers to be able to respond in the jurisdiction within a specified period of time, determined by the local entities.

The amendment also specifies that the officers must be a resident of Missouri.

The police officer may be able to live outside the city, but they cannot live outside the state.

Part one of the amendment was defeated, but the House adopted the amendment requiring police officers to live in Missouri.

The revised bill passed the first-round in the House with a simple majority vote.

Seventy-two members voted yes for the bill, and sixty-six members voted no.

But the bill needs a two-thirds majority vote for it to pass in the second-round.

That means at least eighty-two members must vote for the bill.

The bill now waits for further debate.

From Jefferson City, JiaoJiao Shen.


Peace officers wouldn't have to live in the city, town, or county they serve under legislation approved by Missouri's House. JiaoJiao Shen has the story from Jefferson City.

Story:
RunTime: 34
OutCue: SOC

Missouri House members gave preliminary approval to a house bill allowing police officers to live outside their jurisdiction.

Currently, cities and towns can require their officers to live within the city or town they work.

But Representative Joan Barry of St. Louis County proposed a bill giving officers the right to live where they choose.

Actuality:BAR1
RunTime: 10
OutCue: condition of employment
Contents: Barry says the bill states that no city, town, or county can require a peace officer to reside within the limits of the city or town as a condition of employment.

The House gave the revised bill first-round approval Tuesday morning.

The bill now waits for more debate in the House.

From Jefferson City, JiaoJiao Shen.


Peace officers will be able to live where they choose, under a bill up for consideration in the House. JiaoJiao Shen has more from the Capitol.

Story:
RunTime: 43
OutCue: SOC

Debate resumed Tuesday morning on a bill sponsored by Representative Joan Barry from St. Louis County.

The bill gives police officers the freedom to live where they want.

House members began debating the bill Monday afternoon, and gave the bill preliminary approval Tuesday morning.

Representative Peter Myers spoke against the bill.

Actuality:MYERS1
RunTime: 10
OutCue: vote against this bill
Contents: Myers says this bill takes away local control from the cities, and in many instances, there should be requirements. He encourages that his colleagues vote against this bill.

The bill passed the first round with a simple majority vote. Seventy-two representatives voted for the bill and sixty-six voted against it

But the bill needs at least 82 votes for the bill, for it to completely pass in the second-round.

It now waits for further approval.

From the State Capitol, JiaoJiao Shen.


Peace officers in Missouri don't have to live in the areas they serve anymore, under a bill up for approval in the Missouri House. JiaoJiao Shen has the story in Jefferson City.

Story:
RunTime: 44
OutCue: SOC

The Missouri House gave first-round approval to a bill saying cities, towns, and counties cannot require their peace officers to live in the city, town, or county they serve.

The House began debate on the bill Monday afternoon. The debate resumed Tuesday morning and was approved with a 72-66 vote.

Representative Connie Johnson of St. Louis City spoke out against the bill.

Actuality:JOHNSON1
RunTime: 16
OutCue: what happens there
Contents: Johnson says if you live in an area that you have to protect and serve, then why not live in that area. If you don't live there, then you don't have a real vested interest in what goes on there.

Despite opposition, the bill passed the first-round with a simple majority.

But it needs at least 82 votes supporting the bill for it to pass on the second-round.

From Jefferson City, JiaoJiao Shen.