From Missouri Digital News: https://mdn.org
MDN Menu

MDN Home

Journalist's Creed

Print

MDN Help

MDN.ORG: Missouri Digital News
MDN Menu

MDN Home

Journalist's Creed

Print

MDN Help

MDN.ORG Mo. Digital News Missouri Digital News MDN.ORG: Mo. Digital News MDN.ORG: Missouri Digital News
Help  


NewsBook: Missouri Government News for Week of January 1, 2001

 


. Chief Ashcroft accuser to host Missouri's inauguration. (01/5/01)
JEFFERSON CITY - Just 12 years after his own second inauguration as Missouri's governor, John Ashcroft will find one of his chief opponents as master of cermonies for Missouri's next governor.

Bob Holden has chosen Missouri Supreme Court Judge Ronnie White to be the lead host for Monday's inaugration.

As a U.S. senator, Ashcroft had blocked White's nomination to the federal bench. Now, White is expected to testify before the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee in opposition to Ashcroft's nomination as U.S. Attorney General.


. St. Louis city's election organization is blasted. (01/5/01)
JEFFERSON CITY - Missouri's secretary of state delivered a scathing report about how St. Louis city handled the November elections.

The report identified a number of problems including duplicate voting records, poor communication and even voting rosters that fell apart.

Secretary of State Bekki Cook expressed surprise at the number of problems her staff investigation had discovered.


. Roger Wilson says goodbye. (01/4/01)
JEFFERSON CITY - In a speech marked by humor, Gov. Roger Wilson said goodbye to a joint session of Missouri's legislature after 24 years in state office.

As lieutenant governor, Wilson moved into the governor's office after the October plane-crash death of the late Mel Carnahan. Prior to that, Wilson had been a state senator and chaired the Senate's Appropriations Committee.

In his legislative address, Wilson urged civility in politics and construction of a Capitol addition on the Missouri River that would serve as a memorial to Carnahan.

  • Get the radio story.
    . Power sharing approved in Missouri's Senate (01/3/01)
    JEFFERSON CITY - In an historic agreement, Missouri's Senate approved a power-sharing plan that splits control of the state's upper chamber between Republicans and Democrats.

    Under the plan approved by the Senate, there will be co-chairs of committees, each party will have an equal number of members on each committee, the floor leaders will share power for deciding the daily business of the Senate and there will be two president pro tems to share power of the Senate's top officer.

    Under the new Senate organization, the bipartisan power sharing will last only as long as neither party has a clear 18-vote majority in the Senate.

    When the Senate met, Republicans were in control 16-15, with three vacancies -- seats originally held by two Democrats and one Republican. If those vacant seats do not change party, the Senate would be tied 17-17.