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The legislative year came to end Friday

May 13, 2000

The Missouri Legislative Session has come to end, and the parties are blaming each other for the unproductive session.

From the state capitol Renny MacKay has the report on the end of the session.

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On the last day of the session the legislature passed 13 bills but left several others off the books, including use of the tobacco settlement, the point 0-8 blood alcohol driving bill, a bill to end the execution of mentally retarded murderers and a bill to change the H-M-O system.

Democratic leaders, like Steve Gaw blame the Republicans.

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Contents: The Speaker of the House says people in the other party played party games to defeat serious legislation.

The Republicans say the Democrats had the majority and should have been able to do whatever they pleased.

From the state capitol, I'm Renny MacKay.


Another year is on the books for Missouri lawmakers, but the close of session didn't stop the parties from taking a few parting shots at each other.

From Jefferson City, Renny MacKay has the story.

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The first year of the millenium has ended what is being called an unproductive and "tough" year for the Missouri legislature.

The Republicans hope it brings the end of an era.

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Contents: Micheal Gibbons says he thinks the people of Missouri are ready for a change of leadership, the first of its kind in 46 years.

Micheal Gibbons is part of the House Republican leadership and is running for the Senate this November.

The Republicans blamed the Democratic leadership for the lack of production this year.

While the Democrats blame the Republicans for playing politics and derailing beneficial legislation.

From the state capitol, I'm Renny MacKay.


The first legislative session of the new millenium is over. But, the partisanship of the last century has remained and even gotten worse according to some of Missouri's top party leaders.

Renny MacKay has more from Jefferson City.

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The legislative session ended at the stroke of six o'clock Friday evening. During the day 13 bills were passed and sent to the governor.

But, looking back on the year, the Democratic leader of the Senate, Ed Quick, says he's worried about a trend towards partisan bickering interfering with law making.

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Contents: He says we have seen a trend get started that we'll have to deal with for a while.

The legislature killed bills to regulate H-M-O's, and stop the execution of the mentally retarded on Friday, but did pass bills to regulate telemarketers and monitor racial profiling by Missouri police.

From the state capitol, I'm Renny MacKay.


The Missouri Legislature finished its last day Friday, and did so without passing a bill to stop the execution of people with mental retardations.

Renny MacKay has the story from Jefferson City.

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The bill to stop the executions was put on a much larger bill dealing with Missouri courts. The bill only passed the House Friday morning and it was loaded with changes by the House. That didn't leave the Senate much time to look over the changes.

Senator John Schneider sponsored the bill and said it was one of the changes from the House that ended up killing his bill.

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Contents: Schneider says it was a provision to give a prosecuting attorney in a particular county a pay raise that caused a Senator to kill the bill.

That Senator filibustered the bill. And because the bill got to the Senate Friday afternoon there was no time to take the provision out.

Schneider said there is no one on death row right now who is mentally retarded so isn't concerned about waiting a year to try and pass the bill again.

From the state capitol, I'm Renny MacKay.


On the final day of the Missouri legislative session lawmakers passed 13 bills. One of those bills was a bill to gather information on racial profiling.

From Jefferson City Renny MacKay has more.

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The House gave final approval to the bill to make Missouri cops record the race, gender, and age of the people they pull over.

But, not all were satisfied with the bill. Representative Jon Dolan calls himself the most progressive Republican on civil rights issues.

He says doesn't believe racist cops will record it when they violate someone's rights.

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Contents: He says cops won't write that down and wishes the Senate had supported a measure to fund a program that would allow the Attorney General to investigate racial profiling.

Dolan and Rita Days, the bill's sponsor, say the bill is just the beginning.

From the state capitol, I'm Renny MacKay.


In what many called one of the least productive years in recent memory, the Missouri legislature did pass a bill cracking down on telemarketers.

Renny MacKay has more from Jefferson City.

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On the final day of the legislative session, the House gave final approval to a bill tightening up restrictions on telemarketing companies.

The bill must be signed by the governor to become law. Once it is law it will create a list Missourians can put their names on if they don't wish to be called by people soliciting their business.

Representative Catherine Hanaway is happy with the bill but is concerned the bill isn't treating everyone fairly.

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Contents: She says she thinks the bill should treat politicians the same as businesses.

The bill would fine businesses calling people on the list up to 5000 dollars. It does allow non-profit groups to call people on the no-call list.

From the state capitol, I'm Renny MacKay.