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College Tax Credits

September 19, 1996
By: Phill Brooks
State Capital Bureau

Missouri's governor says he will ask state lawmakers next year to approve a plan to give tax breaks for students attending college. Phill Brooks has the story from Jefferson City:

Story: Brooks
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OutCue: SOC

It is the second major tax proposal announced by the governor so far this fall.

The first was near elimination of the state sales tax on groceries.

The latest is a 15-hundred dollar a year tax credit for college tuition and fees for the first two years of school.

In announcing the plan, Mel Carnahan described it as a way to get better jobs for Missourians.

Actuality:
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Contents: [102K WAV file - Carnahan says college prepares Missourians for the jobs of tommorrow.]

Carnahan's Republican opponent for reelection -- State Auditor Margaret Kelly -- was unavailable for comment after the governor's announcement.

Earlier, she had said she'd limit her campaign to the last six weeks before the November election.

SOC


Another tax-relief plan has been proposed by Missouri's governor. Phill Brooks has the story from Jefferson City:

Story: Brooks
RunTime:
OutCue: SOC

Last month, the governor endorsed a sales tax cut on food. This month, he's endorsed tax refunds for college-student tuition.

Under Mel Carnahan's proposal, Missouri college students would get up to 15-hundred dollars a year in tax credits for the first two years of college.

Both public and private school students would be eligible under Carnahan's plan:

Actuality:
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Contents: Carnahan says tax credits will help ease the debts college students acquire from school.

Carnahan's plan would be phased in during a three-year period starting in January of 1998.

The Higher Education Department estimates some 89-thousand Missourians eventually would qualify for the benefits.

SOC